Presenting…

William Smith fossils

‘Presenting…’ is a changing display of treasures from the Museum.

The link on the right takes you to our current display, now on view in the Museum: The science of disguise. We look at insects that have evolved to resemble another in order to trick prey or predators, and ones that use camouflage, by mimicking bark or leaves.

Below you can browse through our previous Presenting... exhibits.
Please click on the picture to the left for the full page.

William Smith fossils

William Smith
Almost 200 years ago, William Smith published the first geological map of England and Wales. This was an incredible feat, requiring an enormous breadth of geological knowledge.






Alfred Russel Wallace

Alfred Russel Wallace
Thursday 7 November 2013 marked the centenary of the death of Alfred Russel Wallace, one of the 19th-century’s greatest explorers and naturalists. This exhibit celebrates Wallace’s long association with the Oxford University Museum of Natural History and its collections.





Limerick meteorite

A space traveller's arrival
At 9 o’clock in the morning on September 10th, 1813, the residents of County Limerick in Ireland had a bit of a surprise. They hear loud bangs as a shower of meteorites fell to ground. More than 48kg of rock had just arrived on Earth from space!





Catprints

Museum memories
If there is one person who has a very special knowledge of our amazing building and collections, it is Chris Burras. Chris, who was Head of Technical Services for many years, retired in 2013, and here he describes some his favourite things in the Museum.





Fulgurites

Fulgurites
It is astonishing to think that a split second of stormy weather can be captured in stone. This is is exactly what happened when a bolt of lightning struck drifting sand near Drigg, in Cumbria. The intense heat fused the sand grains together to form the delicate glassy tube you can see to the left - a fulgurite.





Trace fossil

Schoolboy discovers rare trace fossil
An extremely rare trace fossil of footprints laid down more than 300 million years ago was brought to the Museum recently by ten-year-old schoolboy Bruno Debattista. Thinking that the piece of shale rock he had collected while on holiday in Cornwall might contain a fossilised imprint, Bruno showed the specimen to our Education department’s Natural History After-School Club, which he had been attending each week.



Burchell's tortoise

William Burchell
March 2013 commemorated the 150th anniversary of the death of explorer and naturalist William John Burchell. He left a treasure trove of natural history specimens, many of which are now in the Museum.

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